Old Brickyard, Chelsea

Dean - Old Brickyard, Chelsea.JPG

Dublin Core

Title

Old Brickyard, Chelsea

Description

Sometimes called Low Point, Chelsea, NY is located north of the present-day Newburgh-Beacon Bridge. Dean’s etching shows the ruins of what had once been a thriving Hudson River industry, using mud from seasonal deposits. We see grass in the foreground, possibly of some marshy variety, and a profusion of foliage in various textures reclaiming the brickworks buildings. At far right, a human figure serves to render the scale.

About the Artist
: Born Robert Jerome Dean in Chattanooga, TN, this NDG artist was primarily a cartoonist. Having attempted to join the circus as a contortionist, Dean moved with his family to Buffalo and eventually studied at the Student Art League. His first job was drawing turf cartoons for Horse World—Buffalo, then editorial cartoons for the Buffalo Times. In 1905 Dean joined the Atlanta News (a city where he lived for several years). Dean was a prolific, sometimes imaginative illustrator at Joel Chandler Harris’s Uncle Remus’s Magazine; while working there he created a hybrid fantasy story-comic strip called The Zotwots that was published between 1908 and 1914. When Harris’s magazine folded the strip ran for a short period in the New York Herald. Like many other cartoons of this period, racial humor and minstrelsy sometimes informed Dean’s series. He then moved to New York City to find work where he could as a writer and illustrator: Collier’s magazine, the New York Journal, Herald, and Telegraph Some of his drawings found their way onto lithographs, wooden jigsaw puzzles, and ceramic plates. He spent his last twenty years living in Dutchess County. 2 more images at FAP.

Creator

Dean, Bob, 1875-1949

Publisher

Federal Art Project

Date

1935-1940

Contributor

Ritz, Abigail (photography)

Cooper, Ken (biography)

Source

New Deal Gallery, Genesee Valley Council on the Arts

Object #FA18141

Format

jpeg, 973 KB

Type

Still image

Identifier

051

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Original Format

Woodcut print

Physical Dimensions

10.5 x 8.5 in.
Condition: surface dirt

Geolocation