Browse Items (789 total)

Central Park 1860--resized.jpg
In 1853 after extensive study, the New York City Common Council approved a site surrounding the Croton Reservoir for a Manhattan park. Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted and designer Calvert Vaux were winners of a design competition, and in…

Abernathy--Orchard@2x.jpg
The title of this painting is paradoxical, since none of the trees depicted appear to be the fruiting varieties usually associated with commercial orchards. Nor is it entitled "Arboretum," a collection of species under a landscaping rubric. Instead,…

Bow Bridge--cropped.jpg
Designed by Calvert Vaux and Jacob Wrey Mould, and completed in 1862, this 87-foot span was the second cast-iron bridge constructed in the US. Its likeness to the bow of a violinist or archer gave the structure its name. Stereoview taken probably not…

Bow Bridge--small.jpg
Photograph of iconic cast iron bridge in New York's Central Park was one of six created for an historical survey in 1984. The description reads: "Designed by Calvert Vaux, the Bow Bridge is one of the most prominently located and visible cast iron…

Financial Insecurity.jpg
This poster is one of many "soil conservation charts" created by the US Department of Agriculture during the 1930s, specifically in response to conditions of drought and farming practices that had exacerbated the problem. In this instance, the Soil…

Breakneck Ridge--original.jpg
Breakneck Ridge is located in the Hudson Highlands, directly across the river from Storm King Mountain. Its distinctive stony face was picturesque, albeit quarried for granite by the 19th century. It posed a major obstacle in plans to build a…

New York Central.jpg
By the time of this map a bitter consolidation battle among smaller rail lines had resulted in the creation of New York Central in 1853. Then, under the leadership of aggressive presidents Erastus Corning and Cornelius Vanderbilt, NYC expanded into a…

Potsdam@0.5x.jpg
A 19th-century gazetteer described Potsdam, located on the Raquette River, as having "a great variety of beatiful situations" and in particular a waterfall near the center of town. During that time its uses were directed primarily to milling…

Raquette River.jpg
The Raquette River has its headwaters at the outlet of Raquette Lake, in the Adirondack Mountains, and flows 146 miles to the St. Lawrence River. It passes through numerous marshes and small lakes; both before and after European arrival, it has been…
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